Survivalist SSB CB Freeband Channel Frequency List


Information for Survivalist, Prepper, or SHTF Survival Communications using Single SideBand CB radio around 27 MHz.
Survivalist 375 CB SSB Radio
The original source of this article is the RadioMaster Reports blog.

Freeband
Freeband frequencies around 27 MHz CB have been widely used by thousands and thousands of freebanders worldwide over the past 40+ years. Here in this list, we document the best and most common Single SideBand (SSB, USB, LSB) Freeband frequencies useful for Survivalists. We cover mainly SSB because it is by far the best method. SSB is so much better than either AM or FM, that it should be the the prime choice of survivalists and SHTF preppers everywhere, for direct communication over wide areas between mobiles and base stations.

Extra Super Secret Channels
The Survivalist SSB CB Freeband Channel Frequency List is the essential chart of Secret CB channels, CB SSB channels, …

©2013 RadioMaster Reports

…enter the zone of Freeband Frequencies, Splinter Channels, Drop Channels, Hidden Channels, Gap Channels, Upper Channels, High Channels, Extra Channels, and Zero Channels, Hidden Frequencies, Private Channels, Secret Channels, Stealth Frequency.

About Freeband
Freeband refers to unlicensed transmitting on the frequencies above, below, and in between normal HF radio bands. Freebanding is communicating on the freeband frequencies. CB radios and HAM radios can be modified to get freeband channels.

Survivalist Channel – Prepper Channel
CB, Freeband, and Ham 10 meter Band: Calling Channels


========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===3 | 26.985 AM == PREPPER CH 3 AM
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==37 | 27.375 USB = PREPPER SURVIVALIST
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==42 | 27.425 USB = PREPPER SURVIVALIST
HAM BAND | HAM ==28.305 | 28.305 USB = HAM PREPPER SURVIVALIST

Survivalist Prepper Channel | CB SSB Freeband

AM Amplitude Modulation
AM is the basic modulation mode in standard CB radios. It is good for short range communication with common CB radios and CB HT (handheld) radios or walkie talkies. Some CB radios also have Single Sideband (SSB). AM is prone to more interference and doesn’t go as far as SSB.

Single Sideband CB Radio USB Upper Sideband

Single Sideband CB Radio USB Upper Sideband


Video: Typical Vehicle Mobile SSB CB Radio Long Distance Communications

Upper SideBand (USB) or Lower SideBand (LSB)
Single SideBand (SSB) CB radios are very popular for freeband. SSB is by far the best freeband mode. LSB is mostly used for local area and “skip talking” in English language in North America. USB is used often for long distance, International communications, or Spanish language in North or South America. The choice of which sideband to use is not etched in stone. USB is usually selected for prepper and SHTF Survival channels because it is clearer and more compatible with various types of radios.

Single Sideband CB Radio Clarifier

Single Sideband CB Radio Clarifier

Freeband Radios
Freebanders use one of the following types of radios to talk on these channels:

1. CB radio modified with “extra channels”, “high channels”, “expanded”, or “unlocked clarifier”.
2. Ham “10 meter” SSB radio that has been modified for 11 meters.
3. Export CB SSB radio, often with Band switch ABCDE or ABCDEFG.
4. Ham HF SSB radio modified for general coverage transmit.
5. Commercial land mobile HF SSB radio.
6. Marine HF SSB radio.
7. Military surplus HF SSB radio or manpack.
8. Aeronautical HF SSB radio.

Video: Some Night Activity on Survivalist Prepper Freeband Channel 27.425 kHz SSB


Video: Activity on Survivalist Prepper Freeband Channel 27.425 kHz SSB

Freeband Radio License
“License? Freebanders don’t need no stinkin’ license!” Freebanders don’t have a license for these frequencies. CB radio rules, channels, modes, and frequency bands vary quite a lot from country to country.  99.99% of the time, the governments don’t enforce radio rules or regulations on the common freeband frequencies unless someone uses a high power linear amplifier to create radio interference for neighborhood TV sets or other services. Enforcement pretty much gave up on this part of the spectrum a long time ago, and it is mostly considered “sacrificial spectrum” in the “wild west of radio”. However, there are some frequencies in this spectrum that wise freebanders avoid. For example, between 28.000 MHz and 29.700 MHz, the 10 meter ham band, they are very likely to be tracked by ham operators and reported to the authorities. In USA, many CB truck drivers don’t heed freebander frequency caution; they often talk on 28.085 MHz (sometimes known as “high 19”) where they are easily tracked down by hams. Their trucking companies are often fined by FCC, and the drivers get fired. Most freeband operators look down upon that kind of carelessness.


Video: Typical Long Distance Vehicle Mobile Communications using SSB CB
Why Freeband
So, with all the issues surrounding it, why do people use freeband? Simple. It works. The frequencies are clear; free of the busy chatter and interference of normal CB channels. Freeband goes further than other common unlicensed radios like FRS, GMRS, or MURS. Freeband distance range is similar to ham radio 10 meter HF SSB. Freeband is compatible with the CB radios. The radios are widely available, inexpensive, ubiquitous, and easy to use.


Video: Typical Long Distance Communications using SSB CB Freeband

Freeband Operating Methods
Freebanders usually use fake callsign numbers or letters to anonymize themselves. These are different callsigns than the ones they use on Normal CB Channels. If talking about locations they are usually vague or use informal code words known only to each other. Freeband users often are normal CB users who just want some of the long distance communication advantages of ham radio HF SSB, but without a license. Freebanders go in between or outside the normal CB channels to achieve long distance communication that would be nearly impossible on the normal 40 CB channels. Radios with expanded channels, Export CB Bands or a VFO feature with frequency display, can transmit above the CB band. Even a very old used SSB CB modified with expanded clarifier slider can tune slightly off frequency to the Drop Gap (LSB) or High Gap (USB) clear space between channels. To avoid detection, freebanders often transmit from vehicles instead of base stations. Long distance can be achieved by parking away from power lines on an isolated hilltop, side road, or open parking lot. By limiting conversations on the freeband channels to only what is necessary and avoiding long-winded chat or skip-talking, the detection footprint is minimized. Freebander groups usually have one or two frequencies they use as a “call channel” for initially making contact, and then select another frequency at random for continued conversation. They usually avoid talking about specific activities or using coarse language that might make them stand out. Instead, they try to blend in casually.


Video: Typical CB SSB Solid Local Communications Using Whip Antenna on a Pickup Truck
Freeband Radios for SHTF
Freeband-capable CB radios are well-suited to SHTF survivalist situations. The direct radio-to-radio distance range of freeband CB SSB is much greater than a ham VHF/UHF HT or MURS or FRS or GMRS. This is because 27MHz travels further than line-of-sight, due to ground wave that can extend the range over hills and valleys. A big advantage is that inconspicuous CB SSB radios modified for freeband look exactly like normal CB radios. With a good antenna, these radios can usually cover a wide range around a local town or county area. The radios run on 12 Volt DC, can be powered for many days on a car battery, and then recharged with solar or alternative energy. The addition of high power linear amplifiers to CB SSB can greatly extend the groundwave range. Military surplus manpack HF SSB radios can be used for freeband. Marine HF SSB radios can be modified for freeband, and some Aeronautical HF radios can work on freeband. Keep in mind that many of these radios are only capable of Upper SideBand, so USB is usually selected for SHTF survival HF freeband frequencies.


Video: Unlocking Clarifier and Extra Channels on Uniden Bearcat 980 SSB CB


Video: Unlocked Clarifier and Extra Channels on Cobra 148 GTL SSB CB

CB SSB Clarifer Unlock Modification

Typical CB SSB Clarifer Unlock Modification Schematic


Video: Typical Ham Radio HF SSB Modified for Freeband SSB
Ham Radio 10 Meter Band SSB
Some freeband operators are also ham operators. And some ham operators are also freeband operators. But, a lot of so-called export radios that are made for the 10 meter ham band are utilized on freeband. Keep in mind that there is a ham radio Survivalist-Prepper channel SSB frequency in the 10 meter band. It is available and legal for Technician class operators.
HAM LICENSE ONLY:
========= THE 10 METER HAM BAND= ====== ====== ===============
HAM BAND AMATEUR 10 METER 28.000 TO 29.700 BAND F/G
HAM BAND | 28.305 = USB | 28.305 USB*HAM PREPPER TECH SSB*
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
* SURVIVALIST/PREPPER CHANNELS

Historic Background of Freeband SSB Survivalist activity.

1971-1976. It was very common to use splinter gap channels with expanded unlocked clarifiers on 23 channel CBs. Survivalist freeband SSBers were found on 27168 USB (just above normal CB channel 16). Frequency modifications for use outside the normal CB band required the use of an external VFO or slider, or else the internal modification with a switch and quartz crystals.

In 1977, the new 40 channel digitally tuned PLL phase-locked-loop radios started to flood the CB market. CB SSB radios could be bought for under $100. Many SSB survivalists tended to call on normal CB channel 37 USB (27375 kHz) and then slid up with unlocked clarifiers or sliders to 27378 USB or down to 27368 to get away from AM interference.

Freeband Upper SideBand (USB) Gap Frequencies Between Normal CB Channels

By late 1977, as the new 40 channels became crowded, most began expanding the PLL channel selectors on their radios for the non-official channels above 40, which became known as The Uppers. Freeband PLL modification of those 40 channel CBs was easy: cut some PC board traces and solder wires to add-on toggle switches; re-purpose the noise blanker or PA switch. A lot of the freebander SSBers abandoned their old unlocked clarifier/slider splinter channels for the greener pastures of The Uppers.

By 1978, the freeband 27425 kHz frequency was called Channel 42. These days it is known as Upper 2, or E2, or Hi 425. It was very active with a large number of independent-minded back-to-the-land folks. 27425 USB became a watering hole for backwoods hippies and non-conformist survivalists, way before anyone ever heard of the word “prepper”. Most used 3 digit or 4 digit callsigns, and/or very common names such as John, Mike, Bill, Bob, Mary, etc. [not their real names]. Folks seemed to get along OK on 27425 USB with each other, often talking about hunting, food, bushcraft, vehicles, solar power, cabins, windmills, horses, snares, guns, knives, camping, and modifying radios. There were around 150 to 200 active operators on this channel who mostly knew each other via skip or groundwave. Occasionally, political discussions led to drunken rants or verbal combat:) But, most were friendly, intelligent folks when they weren’t operating-while-inebriated. 27425 USB continued to be a very active survivalist channel throughout the 1980s.

By the early 1990s, only a small number of the old timer freeband survivalists were still on the air. By the late 1990s it seemed like everyone drifted away from CB/freeband and found the internet.

Fast forward to 2001-2015. A rebirth of survivalism and the growing popularity of prepping led to a resurgence of interest in emergency survivalist communications.

In 2011 the old RadioMaster logbook of channel lists was dusted off and transferred to spreadsheets. These lists were passed around by email among old friends and posted on a few CB and prepper forums.

In 2013, it seemed like the interest in survivalist comms had increased enough to do a series of articles specifically on the subject.


Video: Typical CB Installation with Linear Amplifier
Freeband Radios Channel Charts

Here are some freeband frequency channel charts for various types of radios.

==============================================================
Channel List Prepper Survivalist AM SSB CB Freeband
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==1 | 26.962 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===1 | 26.965 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==1 | 26.968 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====1/2 | 26.970 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==2 | 26.972 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===2 | 26.975 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==2 | 26.978 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====2/3 | 26.980 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==3 | 26.982 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===3 | 26.985 AM *CB PREPPER CH 3 AM*
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==3 | 26.988 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====3/3A | 26.990 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =3A | 26.992 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL ==3A | 26.995 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =3A | 26.998 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====3A/4 | 27.000 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==4 | 27.002 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===4 | 27.005 AM CB 4X4 4WD JEEP CLUBS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==4 | 27.008 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====4/5 | 27.010 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==5 | 27.012 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===5 | 27.015 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==5 | 27.018 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====5/6 | 27.020 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==6 | 27.022 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===6 | 27.025 AM SKIP TALKER HIGH POWER CB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==6 | 27.028 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====6/7 | 27.030 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==7 | 27.032 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===7 | 27.035 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==7 | 27.038 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====7/7A | 27.040 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =7A | 27.042 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL ==7A | 27.045 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =7A | 27.048 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====7A/8 | 27.050 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==8 | 27.052 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===8 | 27.055 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==8 | 27.058 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====8/9 | 27.060 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==9 | 27.062 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===9 | 27.065 AM EMERGENCY CB AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==9 | 27.068 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====9/10 | 27.070 LSB/USB
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =10 | 27.072 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==10 | 27.075 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =10 | 27.078 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===10/11 | 27.080 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =11 | 27.082 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==11 | 27.085 AM LOCAL CB CALLING
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =11 | 27.088 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==11/11A | 27.090 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP 11A | 27.092 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL =11A | 27.095 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP 11A | 27.098 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==11A/12 | 27.100 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP 12A | 27.102 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==12 | 27.105 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =12 | 27.108 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===12/13 | 27.110 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =13 | 27.112 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==13 | 27.115 AM RV OR CAMPERS CB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =13 | 27.118 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===13/14 | 27.120 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =14 | 27.122 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==14 | 27.125 AM CB WALKIE=TALKIES
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =14 | 27.128 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===14/15 | 27.130 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =15 | 27.132 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==15 | 27.135 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =15 | 27.138 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==15/15A | 27.140 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP 15A | 27.142 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL =15A | 27.155 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP 15A | 27.148 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==15A/16 | 27.150 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =16 | 27.152 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==16 | 27.155 AM CB 4X4 4WD JEEP CLUBS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =16 | 27.158 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===16/17 | 27.160 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =17 | 27.162 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==17 | 27.165 AM CB HIGHWAY TRUCKERS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =17 | 27.168 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===17/18 | 27.170 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =18 | 27.172 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==18 | 27.175 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =18 | 27.178 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===18/19 | 27.180 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =19 | 27.182 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==19 | 27.185 AM CB HIGHWAY TRUCKER PRIMARY
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =19 | 27.188 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==19/19A | 27.190 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP 19A | 27.192 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL =19A | 27.195 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP 19A | 27.198 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==19A/20 | 27.200 LSB/USB
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =20 | 27.202 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==20 | 27.205 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =20 | 27.208 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===20/21 | 27.210 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =21 | 27.212 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==21 | 27.215 AM CB HIGHWAY TRUCKERS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =21 | 27.218 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===21/22 | 27.220 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =22 | 27.222 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==22 | 27.225 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =22 | 27.228 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===22/24 | 27.230 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =24 | 27.232 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==24 | 27.235 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =24 | 27.238 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===24/25 | 27.240 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =25 | 27.242 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==25 | 27.245 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =25 | 27.248 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===25/23 | 27.250 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =23 | 27.252 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==23 | 27.255 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =23 | 27.258 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===23/26 | 27.260 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =26 | 27.262 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==26 | 27.265 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =26 | 27.268 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===26/27 | 27.270 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =27 | 27.272 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==27 | 27.275 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =27 | 27.278 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===27/28 | 27.280 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =28 | 27.282 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==28 | 27.285 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =28 | 27.288 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===28/29 | 27.290 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =29 | 27.292 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==29 | 27.295 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =29 | 27.298 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===29/30 | 27.300 LSB/USB
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =30 | 27.302 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==30 | 27.305 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =30 | 27.308 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===30/31 | 27.310 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =31 | 27.312 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==31 | 27.315 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =31 | 27.318 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===31/32 | 27.310 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =32 | 27.322 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==32 | 27.325 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =32 | 27.328 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===32/33 | 27.330 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =33 | 27.332 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==33 | 27.335 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =33 | 27.338 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===33/34 | 27.340 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =34 | 27.342 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==34 | 27.345 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =34 | 27.348 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===34/35 | 27.350 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =35 | 27.352 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==35 | 27.355 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =35 | 27.358 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===35/36 | 27.360 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =36 | 27.362 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==36 | 27.365 USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =36 | 27.368 USB [OBSOLETE SURVIVALIST]
FREEBAND | GAP ===36/37 | 27.370 LSB/USB [SOME PREPPERS]
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =37 | 27.372 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==37 | 27.375 USB PREPPER SURVIVALIST SSB*
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =37 | 27.378 USB [OBSOLETE PREPPER]
FREEBAND | GAP ===37/38 | 27.380 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =38 | 27.382 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==38 | 27.385 LSB/USB MAIN CB LSB CALLING
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =38 | 27.388 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===38/39 | 27.390 USB [SOME PREPPERS]
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =39 | 27.392 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==39 | 27.395 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =39 | 27.398 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===39/40 | 27.400 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =40 | 27.402 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==40 | 27.405 AM/LSB/USB
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
========= THE UPPERS==== ======= ====== === HIGH BAND E ======
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | ==== 41 ZERO | 27.410 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==41 | 27.415 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN 1
FREEBAND | ==== 42 ZERO | 27.420 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==42 | 27.425 USB SURVIVALIST PREPPER “E2”
FREEBAND | ==== 43 ZERO | 27.430 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==43 | 27.435 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=3
FREEBAND | ==== 44 ZERO | 27.440 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==44 | 27.445 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=3A
FREEBAND | ==== 45 ZERO | 27.450 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==45 | 27.455 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=4
FREEBAND | ==== 46 ZERO | 27.460 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==46 | 27.465 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=5
FREEBAND | ==== 47 ZERO | 27.470 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==47 | 27.475 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=6
FREEBAND | ==== 48 ZERO | 27.480 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==48 | 27.485 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=7
FREEBAND | ==== 49 ZERO | 27.490 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==49 | 27.495 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=7A
FREEBAND | ==== 50 ZERO | 27.500 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==50 | 27.505 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=8
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
========= THE UPPERS==== ======= ====== ======================
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | ==== 51 ZERO | 27.510 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==51 | 27.515 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=9
FREEBAND | ==== 52 ZERO | 27.520 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==51 | 27.515 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=10
FREEBAND | ==== 53 ZERO | 27.530 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==53 | 27.535 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=11
FREEBAND | ==== 54 ZERO | 27.540 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==54 | 27.545 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=11A
FREEBAND | ==== 55 ZERO | 27.550 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==55 | 27.555 LSB/USB E12 FREEBAND CALLING
FREEBAND | ==== 56 ZERO | 27.560 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==56 | 27.565 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=13
FREEBAND | ==== 57 ZERO | 27.570 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==57 | 27.575 LSB/USB E14 =NOT RECOMMENDED
FREEBAND | ==== 58 ZERO | 27.580 LSB/USB =====NOT RECOMMENDED!
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==58 | 27.585 LSB/USB E15 =NOT RECOMMENDED!
FREEBAND | ==== 59 ZERO | 27.590 LSB/USB =====NOT RECOMMENDED!
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==59 | 27.595 LSB/USB E15A NOT RECOMMENDED
FREEBAND | ==== 60 ZERO | 27.600 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==60 | 27.605 AM/LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=16
FREEBAND | ABOVE CH==61 | 27.610 TO 27.999 E17 NOT RECOMMENDED
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================

Ranger_6300_6900_Channel_Frequency

Galaxy_2100_FrequencyChart

Modified_Export_CB_Radio_Channel_Frequency

Export_CB_Radio_Channel_Frequency

Connex_CX_4800_Channel_Frequency

Some possible freeband radios which have ‘extra channels’ in the 11 meter band 27 MHz.

AM/SSB or AM or AM/FM or AM/FM/SSB

ALBRECHT – model: AE-497

COBRA – model: 200 GTL DX

CONNEX – models: 3300, 3300 HP, 3300HP-ZX, 3300 PLUS, CX-3800, 4300 HP, 4300 HP 300, 4400, 4400 HP, 4600, Turbo, 4800 DXL, 4800 HPE, Deer Hunter, General Lee, General Washington, Saturn, CX 33TLM

DRAGON – model: SS-497

EAGLE – models: 2000, Saturn, 5000

GALAXY – models: 33HML, 44V, 45MP, 47, 48T, 55, 55V, 66V, 73V, 77, 77HML, 88HL, 93T, 94, 95T, 98, 99V, 919, 929, 959, 979, 2517, 2527, 2547, DX94HP, DX98VHP, Melaka, Saturn, Turbo, 29HP

GENERAL – General Jackson, Grant, Stonewall Jackson, Lee, Washington, A.P. Hill, Longstreet, Sherman

INTEK – model: Multicom-497

MAGNUM – models: 1012, 257, 357, 357DX, 457, Alpha force, Delta Force, Raptor, Mini, Omega Force,S3, S3RF, S6, S9,

MIRAGE – models: 33HP, 44, 88, 99, 2950, 2950EX, 2970, 6600, 88H/L, 9900, MX-36HP, Stealth

NORTH STAR – models: NS-3000, NS-9000

OMEGAFORCE – models: 45

PRESIDENT – models: Grant, J.F.K., Jackson, Lincoln, HR-2510, HR-2600

PRO STAR – model: 240, 400

RANGER / RCI – models: AR-3500, RCI-2900, RCI-2950, RCI-2950-DX, RCI-2970, RCI-2970-DX, RCI-2980-WX, RCI-2985-DX, RCI-2990,RCI-2995-DX, RCI-6300, RCI-6300 Turbo, RCI-6300F-25, RCI-6300F-150, RCI-6900, RCI-6900 Turbo, RCI-6900F-25, RCI-6900F-150, RG-99, Voyage VR-9000, RHF-618

STRYKER – model: 440

SUPERSTAR – model: 121, 122, 36, 3700, 3900, 3900HP, 3900 American Spirit, 3900 HP G, 3900 Gold, 3900GHPA, 3900GHPM, 4800, 4900, Grant

TEK – model: HR-3950

UNIDEN – models: HR-2510, HR-2600

VIRAGE – model: 3300, 3300 HP, VX-38, VX-39

Note: Most of these are either marketed as 10 meter ham radios, or banned for import into USA, or otherwise looked upon with disdain by do-gooders; so they may show up on auction sites, flea markets, non-mainstream cb places, cb websites, or under-the-counter at truck stops.

Additionally:
MOST HAM HF SSB RADIOS – with modifications, can be used on HF Freeband or CB Freeband.
MOST Military Surplus HF SSB manpacks – can be used on HF Freeband or CB Freeband.


Disclaimer: Content provided in RadioMaster Reports is included for the sole purpose of providing educational information on a passive basis. This information may be useful to the public in the event of emergencies or disaster recovery, especially when normal techniques are not an available option. Users of this educational information are solely responsible for their actions.

©2013 RadioMaster Reports

37 responses to “Survivalist SSB CB Freeband Channel Frequency List

  1. Good detailed information thanks.
    I keep only 5 HF frequencies to hand, CB Ch 9 and 19 (UK and EU) AM/FM, and 27.555 L/USB
    After all that’s hopefully where everyone will be calling on. Just a thought.
    Now what about a chuck up into the trees type aerial?

  2. KWP0626@GMAIL..NET

    Thank You for the info.
    -SODBUSTER

  3. Thank you

  4. Joel "Jo-Jo" Link

    I tried posting something here before… I wonder where it went…
    Anyways…
    I LOVE the info here. It is very helpful. There is one flaw though… USB is not any quieter than LSB. They are, in fact, the same (both SSB – Single Side Band), with just a different “half” of the signal filtered out, to save bandwidth and power. The reason USB is generally used here, is by unofficial international agreements… Where Lower Side Band is generally used on frequencies below 30 Meters (10 MHz), and USB is used above… This is definitely not law, or carved into stone anywhere, so you may find many exceptions to this rule.
    Otherwise, very well put together. I will pass this weblink far and wide!
    Thanx, and 73… Jo-Jo

  5. @ joel “Jo-Jo”,

    The CB freeband SSB operating situation is quite different from ham radio and other services.

    In 27 MHz freeband, both sidebands are used. There are reasons for preferring USB vs LSB for different purposes. Please see the notes about it in the article.

    There are also differences in statistical operating trends between USB and LSB, resulting in more or less interference due to co-channel, adjacent channel, and channel occupancy patterns. The information posted about SSB on RadioMaster Reports is accurate, especially with respect to Survivalist freeband CB.

  6. We like radio master reports.

  7. Great info, just getting back into the cb again after 17 yrs out

  8. New to CB RADIO
    Need all the help I can get PLEASE!!

  9. Cherokee CB’s, even the portables, are as easy to modify as the 10M gear. However, nothing can be as easy to FREQ swap as the RCI-2950. Just move jumpers around, reset, you’re there. Still one of my favorite rigs in the USA / Canada.

  10. Channel Update:

    The skip has been excellent lately, every day.

    Discussions have been going on the air (mostly 27368 upper) between 2 different groups of prepper and survivalist freebanders.

    Several have voiced opinions toward a “unified survivalist/prepper freeband calling channel”. This new calling channel will be instead of the separate Prepper channel and Survivalist channels that have been the trend over the past several years.

    Another issue has been to solve a problem of the lack of unlocked clarifiers (sliders) on many newer “export radios”. Some freebanders just can’t get to the 27368 or 27378 freqs easily. But it seems that all the newer freeband radios can get .nn5 kHz increments.

    The proposed channel is likely to be either 27390 USB or 27370 USB.

    A new article will be posted when there is agreement. Several of us have been monitoring 27390 USB recently, and it appears really good.

    Comments are welcome.

    -RadioMaster

  11. I am so glad I found this site ! I am working on putting together a group of patriots in Montana for information sharing. Most can’t afford ham rigs. So we are working on c bs. Have two lines set up now. Can pass info on for 477 miles on one, 355miles on the other. And will have all directions covered soon. Trying to find a set of used beams or ground plane. Working off a 102 inch steel whip now. Added ground planes and it works ! GREAT! But great site ! Thanks guys.

  12. Is there anyone in the southern part of Montana Butte area, that can work on different c b’s and the like ? Have some equipment that I want to have some things done. And help me get stuff up and on the air. Have not been able to get on site lately. Installed hew solar system for our cabin. 25 years for old system. And it still worked great. But solar cells were down to 80-85 %. Any one want a whole solar systen ? Stacked 2400 watt inverters=230 volts. 96 T-126 Batteries. 16 – 200 watt solar panels. Charge control -Solar Boost 50. And all the wiring. Will trade for radio equipment. Just a idea. Later all.

  13. I would like to work with, and set-up a network of like minded preppers in the Mid-West Region. Thinking up to 500 miles West, Northwest, of the Great Lakes.
    27.390 USB sounds like a great place to start.
    Any thoughts???

  14. yes 27390 USB – is active lately with survivalist-preppers. we noticed some are using distinctive whistles to call. also, we noticed one prepper sending a distinctive smartfone ring tone over the microphone to call a friend. seems like a good way to do it.

  15. That sounds like a good way to get the attention of “your Group” when your not sitting in front of your radio…

  16. It sure seemed to cut through the static.

  17. Has any testing been done on 27390 usb ??? It looks like this could be a “Guard Channel” if the co-ch. interference isn’t toooo bad.

    • To Bravo-50
      Re: 27390 USB. Looking forward to the skip opening to your midwest group. Logged 4 other prepper-survivalists on 27390 USB so far (3 of those are retreads from the old survivalist freeband call channel 27368 USB) A new guy said his radio couldn’t tune in the old 27368 channel, but he can get on this one. One op reports some mild interference from ch 40 AM splatter. It’s not too bad at all for the rest of us. Surprisingly clear for a splinter on the zero within the CB band. Kinda difficult to say if it will catch on and become the big new guard channel. It generally takes a year or two for a channel to catch on. Seems like most preppers still don’t have a clue about SSB! But anyway it is now in the RadioMaster list as *27.390 USB NEW PREPPER/SURVIVALIST*

      • Update: Several ops on 27390 USB have now reported minor interference from 40 AM splatter. It looks like we will be testing 27370 USB soon. It seems clear today.

  18. I will monitor 27370 USB for a few day and report my finding in the Mid-West. Has anyone tested above Ch.40 ???? hint, hint…

    • It seems like a lot of the export and 10 meter radios that everybody is using these days on SSB won’t do the splinter (zero gap) channels between the regular CB channels. Maybe it is time to forget about the splinters and just move back to good old 27425 USB on the uppers like it used to be in the old days.
      FREEBAND | CHANNEL =42 | 27.425 USB (E2) SURVIVALIST HI 425

  19. To radiofreeq

    Your thoughts seem to make the most sense to me. Why try to reinvent something that has always been. The splinters are one thought, but if someone Is “Running Power” on either side of you, your fighting a problem that just doesn’t have to be.

    I must admit that I was standing on the sidelines in the “Old Days” but what I did hear seemed to be working just fine… Not quite following the law but so what? Why was there a move to change the guard channel anyway??? I would expect that anyone within our realm of thought already has equipment that will be able to operate up there. The same antenna will work just fine for both “In-Band” and “Free-Band” operations.

    From a tactical standpoint, the only downside to having just one freq. to guard is that it gives our opponents one place to “Look for us” and “One freq. to jam”….. Just the thoughts of a “old crow” if you understand what that is.

    I will be doing some work on and around HI-425 in the next few days.

    Bravo-50 Out.

  20. Updated the article to include Historic background of Freeband SSB Survivalist activity.

  21. Correct me if Im wrong here but a majority of these freq (ESPECIALLY HAM) require licensing to transmit on and and the radio nazis on the hamster bands will go LIVID over this information. HOWEVER…once you declare “Emergency” you are not subject to FCC Regs. However AGAIN dont you EVER transmit on AERONAUTICAL (Air Band) Freqs…

    • For hams, in an event where life or property is in imminent danger (FCC 97.403 and 97.405) any available means of communication is specifically authorized. If there is a legitimate emergency, I doubt anyone would question you.

      I personally am not livid over the freebanding information in this article. However, if you’re freebanding on 10 meters and interfere with licenced hams, people probably will be upset with you. Especially if you’re using voice on a frequency intended for CW.

      There’s an easy solution. Spend $30 for a Technician Class study guide from the ARRL, find a local ham club and spend $15 for the test and get your licence. The Technician licence really isn’t that difficult, and you might learn a few things studying for it.

      For what it’s worth, many hams (myself included) have a little of the prepper mindset. I’m a storm spotter and a disaster volunteer, but I’m also reasonably prepared for a SHTF scenario.

  22. good way to avoid interference from the other channels. To Casey’s gets away from a lot of hash and mash

  23. Loxfin Kjarr

    thanks for the info on radio frequencies for shtf survivalist channel and prepper channel

  24. I knew of a radio club on one of those channels back in the day… Hell you could call it Club Channels instead of Prepper lol….

    The fact is any channel can be used for shtf survivalist…. and with today’s technology those channels are not hidden anymore… can be easily monitored on a converted fm usb dongle….plus most ham radios nowadays can cover all the bands… it would be better to own a ham radio than those junky 10 meter exports.

    The 90’s was the rebirth of cb freebanding because of internet! CB mods!!! The internet came around and boom!!! people where downloading cb mods for their old radios for free!!!! I remember this very well haha…. also the birth of cb export radios was in the 90’s…. everyone started chasing freeband frequencies with those radios…..just go buy a old copperelectronics magazine or look on their website for proof of this….

  25. Let’s call so-called “freeband” communication what it is: communication on unallocated frequencies. I am a licensed ham. Quite a few hams love to stick straight pins through the coax cables of CBers who use illegal amps. Yes, if there is an emergency/SHTF situation, than all bets are off. Until then, put forth the effort to get a license (come on – you don’t even have to know Morse code any more!).

  26. Folks, its really tempting to go outside the CB band. MOST of the frequencies are still being used for industrial scientific and government use. We have jerks wrecking the 10 meter Ham band, occasionally, a trucking company gets slammed when they decide “Channel 51” is going to be the “lets bash the company channel.” Lets look at 27.490-520- popular area for folks overseas…IT IS ALLOCATED TO SEARCH AND RESCUE. How about below ch.1? Well, 26.600-26.700 area is reportedly used. MARS uses the area around 27.750-28.000, Red cross has a smattering of frequencies above and below the CB band, and the civil air patrol has a bunch of area allocated to them for SAR and short range ground work in the 26.250 and up to 26.890. Government branches you do NOT want to bother are below 26.905…I have heard comms on 26.725 on FM that sure sounded like some really serious fellows. Petroleum industry uses 27.450 area for remote line control and security , the forest service has a bunch of frequencies in the 27.430-495 . I can go on and on…these frequencies, with the exception of small gaps to prevent interference among the licensed users, ARE ACTIVE. If you want to have a radio that can help you and others, Build a real radio station that can work band spectrum from just above the AM broadcast band to light! Its not expensive, its not that hard. I never looked back after I did.

  27. Thanks for the useful info. I have a Stryker 955 radio and it has the ability to reach freqs like 27.368. It has a VFO that can be adjusted in different incruments. I will need these charts for my prep plans in order to be able to communicate with my family members that are all over the state. I do intend to get my Ham license in order to get onto more bands such as 20 meters.

  28. Richard Reynolds

    I operated “HF” channels in the areas above CB channels when CB was only 23 channels, and most of the HFers were on USB. I then got my ham ticket (now extra class ticket) and participate in SAR. I continue to be an avid CBer when I am on the road. Yes, my radio has the ability to tune any frequency from 25 MHz to 29 MHz. I also operate a ham station that talks around the world. I have the ability to operate for four weeks with no power from utilities.

    Believe me that there is no point to all the off-channel and free channel tuning. There are plenty of CB channels that have very little traffic. We now have 40 channels, and some of the upper channels are used in upper side-band mode by many folks across the country. You can tune to all sorts of so-called “secret” channels and the result will be that you will find no one to talk to.

    A major problem with CB is propagation. When “skip rolls in” or when conditions result in nationwide propagation of radio signals, you get such a high noise level (sometimes exceeding S-9) that local communication is totally drowned out.

  29. Just my two cents here….When the SHTF, where is the FCC?? There wont be any regulation for any radio spectrum, so all the info in this forum is going to be very useful. That being said, stay legal now so you dont get your equipment taken away from you. And just so everyone knows, I am a licensed ham operator and have my General Radiotelephone license. Basics everyone should know are the mathematical equation for a basic 1/4 wave antenna. (234/freq in MHZ) You can use this formula to make any 1/4 wave antenna which does not require components to match the antenna system to the radio. for better horizon use, double the length of the antenna for a 1/2 wave, still does not require matching components. just remember to bend the 4 ground plane elements down to about 45degree angle to frovide a 50 impedence at cut frequency. and by using multiples of 1/4 wave lengths, a multiband antenna can be had for really cheep.
    27 MHZ = 102 inches at 1/4 wave also a 1/2 wave at 54 MhZ
    146 MHZ = 18 inches at 1/4 wave also a 3/4 wave antenna at 445 Mhz
    445 MHZ = 6 inches at 1/4 wave also a 1/2 wave antenna at 900 MHz
    Hope this helps

  30. Amelia Martin

    Saved like a favourite, magnificent site!

  31. Any interest in INDIANA, CHNL 16 USB, IS A GOOD CHANNEL. 795

  32. GOOD WEBPAGE, INTERESTING.
    I monitor channel 16 daily 9-8 pm, shout anytime. 795

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