Program Your VHF UHF Transceivers for Disaster Preparedness with FRS GMRS PMR MURS BUSINESS WEATHER MARINE HAM Channel Frequencies


Program Your VHF UHF Transceivers for Disaster Preparedness with FRS GMRS PMR MURS BUSINESS WEATHER MARINE HAM Channel Frequencies
Turn your walkie talkie into a super SHTF survival radio with HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS channels. The secret is in this free programming file. When disaster hits, you won’t need to worry about which type of radio is best for emergency communications, because you can talk to any of them! Emergency preparedness is essential for radio communications.

New file! 99 channels of VHF & UHF Radio FREQUENCIES

In an emergency, you may need to communicate with others on their channels…

©2013 RadioMaster Reports

In an emergency, you may need to communicate with others who are using various types of radios, on many different channels. Are they using an FRS radio? Or is it MURS or GMRS? Or are they on HAM 2 meters? Marine VHF? Don’t let a lack of preparation prevent your emergency communication needs. Whatever it is, wherever you are, prepare for it now by programming all those channels in your radio. When disaster hits, just dial them up and talk.

This frequency file is for programming VHF-UHF transceivers (VHF-UHF HT). It turns your FM HT into a wonderful HAM-FRS-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS-SAR radio for Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Communications.

CSV file for Chirp DOWNLOAD

HT VHF UHF CSV FILE with HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS channels

This CSV file and its companion printable list contains a variety of useful frequencies for the Emcomm Operator, Prepper, Survivalist, or Disaster Preparedness Communicator.

Printable Frequency Chart:

PROGRAMMING FILE FREQUENCY LIST WITH HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-SAR-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS CHANNELS  - CLICK FOR PRINT

All FRS, GMRS, PMR, and MURS channels are programmed (transmitting the most common PL tone squelch but receiving carrier squelch for maximum interoperability). Highly recommended SHTF Survival channels, well-known Ham Prepper organizations’ calling channels, most common Marine VHF Simplex, along with Ham radio 2 meter simplex channels are included. NOAA Weather channels are provided for receive-only purposes. For easier use, each channel has a corresponding abbreviated Channel Name that can be displayed instead of the frequency, selectable in some types of radios.

The original source of this article is the RadioMaster Reports blog.

Many small inexpensive HTs are sold without suitable default programming. To use these radios, as well as similar Ham radios, it is necessary to either program them manually using the keypad, or to use software to load the desired channel frequencies into the radios.
Chirp Radio Programming Software

CHIRP PROGRAMMING SOFTWARE

The Chirp software is convenient and popular.
The downloadable CSV file we provide here can be opened in Chirp, and it may be modified if necessary to add some of your own frequency channels. Then use a USB-to-Radio cable to load the file into your HT radio.

CSV file for Chirp DOWNLOAD

HT VHF UHF CSV FILE WITH HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS CHANNELS

Open CSV File in Chirp

You may need to unlock your radio for full spectrum transmit. YMMV.

Types of services in this programming file 

Note: Material presented here on RadioMaster Reports purposely does not include information or advice about licensing, governmental authorizations, radio rules, or legalities concerning radio frequencies. Please see other radio forums for greater focus on such issues. The focus of this forum is on the technology details of frequencies, programming, and electronic radiocommunication for Emergency Disaster Preparedness and SHTF Radio Survivalist Prepping.

Limitations

The design objective of this programming file is to maximize interoperability with common radio services within 99 channels, so that it can be used within the memory limitations of inexpensive radios. This has led to a small compromise, by not including some less-common business channels and marine commercial duplex radiotelephone channels. An additional larger channel list programming file will be posted on the RadioMaster Reports site for download, when it is updated.

FRS

Family Radio Service (FRS) is a low power, short range, radio system. FRS  walkie talkies are known as “bubble pack radios” because they are sold cheaply in the hang tab shelves of stores or in the toy section. They can be found nearly everywhere on the planet now, and are some of the most ubiquitous radio communication devices in the world. FRS radios are limited to a half-watt of output power (500 milliWatts) and have permanently attached antennas, preventing the addition of an external gain antenna. So, the normal range of FRS walkie talkies in a suburban environment is about a mile or less. FRS Frequencies are FM simplex, 7 channels at 462 MHz and 7 channels at 467 MHz in the UHF band. These channels are in between the GMRS frequencies. GMRS radios may also include FRS channels. The default PL tone for FRS is 67.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #1, or PL XZ, or Sub-channel CTCSS 01.

GMRS

General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) is a local distance radio system in the same UHF band as FRS. GMRS radios can be capable of longer distance range and greater dependability than FRS. GMRS is becoming more popular  as bubble pack walkie talkies (HT) include both GMRS and FRS channels. GMRS-specific frequencies are FM simplex or duplex with 8 channels at 462 MHz and 8 channels at 467 MHz in the UHF band. The maximum power level of a GMRS is limited to 50 Watts. The most common GMRS mobile, base, or repeater radios use external gain antennas. GMRS walkie talkie handheld transceivers (HT) have only 5 Watts or less, commonly with a ducky antenna. Full duplex repeaters can be used with GMRS. GMRS Repeaters have their input channel at 467 MHz, and their output at 462 MHz. The offset is exactly 5 MHz. For repeater use, the field units transmit on 467 Mhz and receive on 462 MHz. Most bubble pack GMRS radios are simplex-only, so they do not function through a repeater. They operate only on the repeater output frequency (GMRS Channels 15 through 22). The default PL tone for GMRS simplex is 67.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #1, or PL XZ, or Sub-channel CTCSS 01. In a GMRS radio, the GMRS channel number is often the same for simplex and duplex, but a secondary (programmable) feature of the channel controls whether it transmits duplex +5MHz split or simplex. The GMRS simplex and duplex (repeater) channels are included in this list and programming file. In the Channel Name, they are programmed and identified separately; the repeater channel has an R in the channel name. For example as GMR 20 is the simplex channel, and GMR20R is the repeater duplex channel. PL tones vary among different repeaters in various geographic areas. The default PL tone for GMRS repeater channels is 141.3 Hz, but it can be changed in the user’s radio programming to another PL tone frequency as required to hit specific repeaters.

PMR446

Personal Mobile Radio (PMR or PMR446) is a low power, short range, radio system similar to FRS. It is very common in Europe, Africa, and Asia.  Walkie talkie bubble pack PMR radios are sold cheaply. PMR radios are limited to a half-watt of output power (500 milliWatts). So, the normal range of PMR walkie talkies in a suburban environment is about a mile or less. PMR frequencies are commonly FM simplex, 8 channels at 446 MHz in the UHF band. An additional 14 digital channels are available for PMR446, but are less common. In USA and many other places, the 446 MHz band is assigned to Amateur Radio Service (Ham) so, all the PMR channels can be used by hams in those areas. The default PL tone for PMR is 67.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #1, or PL XZ, or Sub-channel CTCSS 01. The PMR Prepper channel (PMR 3) (446.03125 MHz) is somewhat interoperable with the Ham UHF Prepper channel (HAM U3) (446.030 MHz).

HAM

Amateur Radio Service, widely known as Ham Radio, is an internationally allocated radio service for non-commercial radio communications. It has frequency bands in all areas of the spectrum. The ham radio frequencies in this list are only a few of the most common VHF and UHF channels used by ham operators for local FM simplex. Additionally the list includes the Prepper Ham VHF simplex channel (146.420 MHz), the Survivalist Ham VHF simplex channel (144.550 MHz) and the Prepper Ham UHF simplex channel (446.030 MHz) that is somewhat interoperable with the PMR Prepper channel 3 (446.03125 MHz). The default PL tone for Ham is 100.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #12, or PL 1Z, or Sub-channel CTCSS 12. Most hams also make use of repeaters in the VHF and UHF bands, but the channels for these repeaters vary according to geographic area. There is no universal repeater channel frequency or PL tone that is valid in all areas, they are all different. When programming your radio, it is advisable to include the repeater channels and PL tones in your area. See a repeater directory for more information.

MARINE

Marine radio service in this list includes the most common simplex VHF channels in use by boats and ships, for inter-ship and safety communications by FM voice. Marine VHF radio is used on the high seas, inland waterways, lakes, and rivers by vessels and shore stations. No PL tone is used by Marine VHF radios, it is all carrier squelch. The Marine channels have the transmit PL tone turned off, and use Receive Carrier Squelch. Most Marine VHF radios also have duplex channels for use when communicating with shore radiotelephone and port operations. The duplex channels are purposely not included in this list, in order to keep the total number of channels below 99.

BUSINESS

Business radio, or commercial VHF and UHF radio channels, are generally set up for specific companies in a local geographic area. There are also a few business radio channels, called Business Itinerant, that are devoted to operation anywhere. These are low power simplex channels, and only 2 of them are included in this list. The Red Dot (151.625 MHz) and the Purple Dot (151.955 MHz) channels are common Business Itinerant channels, and they are some of the most popularly used channels on VHF for commercial or rental HT walkie talkies. The default PL tone for the Business channels is 67.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #1, or PL XZ, or Sub-channel CTCSS 01.

SAR

For EMERGENCY ONLY, SAR is a service channel for Search and Rescue (SAR) or Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) . The primary interoperability channel in USA for SAR is 155.160 MHz FM simplex. This is a very important channel to keep clear for emergency purposes, and should never be transmitted on for non-emergency communications! The purpose is to provide mobile, HT, and base communications for field operations of land or ground search and rescue teams, ambulances, and medical personnel at the scene of incidents. It is identified in the list as the channel name SAREMT. The default interoperability PL tone for SAR EMT is 127.3 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #19, or PL 3A, or Sub-channel CTCSS 19.

Programming Your Radio

The type of radio you have determines how you program it. You may have a mobile, base, or handheld (HT) radio. Some radios require manual programming. Most modern radios have the capability of programming via a cable adapter between your computer USB or serial port, and the microphone or data jack of the radio. Please see your instruction manual or user guide for your radio, for information about how to program it. As an example, we suggest reading this typical Baofeng radio user guide. Download: Baofeng UV-5R Manual Programming Information http://www.miklor.com/uv5r/pdf/uv-5r_v1.0-annotated_by_KC9HI.pdf

PL TONE

All channels in the list are default Carrier Squelch Receive.

All FRS, GMRS, PMR, MURS, BUSINESS, and HAM channels are programmed for Transmitting PL tone. For interoperability, the Transmit PL is set to default to the most common tone frequency for each channel and type of service.

The Marine channels have the transmit PL tone turned off. The user may change and reprogram the PL Tone frequency as needed, or may desire to use Tone Squelch instead of Carrier Squelch.

GMRS FRS MURS PMR MARINE BUSINESS ham WEATHER

CSV PROGRAMMING FILE CHART

MEM CH SLOT
UHF VHF
CHANNEL DESCRIPTION
CHANNEL DISPLAY NAME
FREQUENCY RECEIVE
FREQUENCY TRANSMIT
OFF SET MHZ
PL
TONE HZ
MODE
0
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 1
FRS 01
462.562500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
1
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 1
FRS 1
462.562500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
2
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 2
FRS 2
462.587500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
3
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 3
FRS 3
462.612500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
4
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 4
FRS 4
462.637500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
5
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 5
FRS 5
462.662500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
6
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 6
FRS 6
462.687500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
7
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 7
FRS 7
462.712500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
8
UHF
FRS CH 8
FRS 8
467.562500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
9
UHF
FRS CH 9
FRS 9
467.587500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
10
UHF
FRS CH 10
FRS 10
467.612500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
11
UHF
FRS CH 11
FRS 11
467.637500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
12
UHF
FRS CH 12
FRS 12
467.662500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
13
UHF
FRS CH 13
FRS 13
467.687500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
14
UHF
FRS CH 14
FRS 14
467.712500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
15
UHF
GMRS CH 15
GMRS15
462.550000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
16
UHF
GMRS CH 16
GMRS16
462.575000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
17
UHF
GMRS CH 17
GMRS17
462.600000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
18
UHF
GMRS CH 18
GMRS18
462.625000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
19
UHF
GMRS CH 19
GMRS19
462.650000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
20
UHF
GMRS CH 20
GMRS20
462.675000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
21
UHF
GMRS CH 21
GMRS21
462.700000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
22
UHF
GMRS CH 22
GMRS22
462.725000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
23
UHF
GMRS CH 15 REPEATER 550
GMR15R
462.550000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
24
UHF
GMRS CH 16 REPEATER 575
GMR16R
462.575000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
25
UHF
GMRS CH 17 REPEATER 600
GMR17R
462.600000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
26
UHF
GMRS CH 18 REPEATER 625
GMR18R
462.625000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
27
UHF
GMRS CH 19 REPEATER 650
GMR19R
462.650000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
28
UHF
GMRS CH 20 REPEATER 675
GMR20R
462.675000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
29
UHF
GMRS CH 21 REPEATER 700
GMR21R
462.700000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
30
UHF
GMRS CH 22 REPEATER 725
GMR22R
462.725000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
31
UHF
PMR446 CH 1
PMR 1
446.006250
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
32
UHF
PMR446 CH 2
PMR 2
446.018750
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
33
UHF
PMR446 CH 3
PMR 3
446.031250
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
34
UHF
PMR446 CH 4
PMR 4
446.043750
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
35
UHF
PMR446 CH 5
PMR 5
446.056250
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
36
UHF
PMR446 CH 6
PMR 6
446.068750
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
37
UHF
PMR446 CH 7
PMR 7
446.081250
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
38
UHF
PMR446 CH 8
PMR 8
446.093750
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
39
VHF
MURS CH 1
MURS 1
151.820000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
40
VHF
MURS CH 2
MURS 2
151.880000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
41
VHF
MURS CH 3
MURS 3
151.940000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
42
VHF
MURS CH 4 BLUE DOT
MURS 4
154.570000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
43
VHF
MURS CH 5 GREEN DOT
MURS 5
154.600000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
44
VHF
BUSINESS RED DOT
BUSRED
151.625000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
45
VHF
BUSINESS PURPLE DOT
BUSPUR
151.955000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
46
VHF
MARINE CH 01A
MAR01A
156.050000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
47
VHF
MARINE CH 03A
MAR03A
156.150000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
48
VHF
MARINE CH 05A
MAR05A
156.250000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
49
VHF
MARINE CH 06
MAR06
156.300000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
50
VHF
MARINE CH 07A
MAR07A
156.350000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
51
VHF
MARINE CH 08
MAR08
156.400000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
52
VHF
MARINE CH 09
MAR09
156.450000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
53
VHF
MARINE CH 10
MAR10
156.500000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
54
VHF
MARINE CH 11
MAR11
156.550000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
55
VHF
MARINE CH 12
MAR12
156.600000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
56
VHF
MARINE CH 13
MAR13
156.650000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
57
VHF
MARINE CH 14
MAR14
156.700000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
58
VHF
MARINE CH 15
MAR15
156.750000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
59
VHF
MARINE CH 16 SAFETY
MAR16
156.800000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
60
VHF
MARINE CH 17
MAR17
156.850000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
61
VHF
MARINE CH 18A
MAR18A
156.900000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
62
VHF
MARINE CH 19A
MAR19A
156.950000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
63
VHF
MARINE CH 20A
MAR20A
157.000000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
64
VHF
MARINE CH 21A
MAR21A
157.050000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
65
VHF
MARINE CH 22A
MAR22A
157.100000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
66
VHF
MARINE CH 23A
MAR23A
157.150000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
67
VHF
MARINE CH 62
MAR62
156.125000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
68
VHF
MARINE CH 63A
MAR63A
156.175000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
69
VHF
MARINE CH 65A
MAR65A
156.275000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
70
VHF
MARINE CH 66A
MAR66A
156.325000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
71
VHF
MARINE CH 67
MAR67
156.375000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
72
VHF
MARINE CH 68
MAR68
156.425000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
73
VHF
MARINE CH 69
MAR69
156.475000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
74
VHF
MARINE CH 71
MAR71
156.575000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
75
VHF
MARINE CH 72
MAR72
156.625000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
76
VHF
MARINE CH 73
MAR73
156.675000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
77
VHF
MARINE CH 74
MAR74
156.725000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
78
VHF
MARINE CH 75
MAR75
156.775000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
79
VHF
MARINE CH 76
MAR76
156.825000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
80
VHF
MARINE CH 77
MAR77
156.875000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
81
VHF
MARINE CH 78A
MAR78A
156.925000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
82
VHF
MARINE CH 79A
MAR79A
156.975000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
83
VHF
MARINE CH 80A
MAR80A
157.025000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
84
VHF
MARINE CH 81A
MAR81A
157.075000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
85
VHF
MARINE CH 88A
MAR88A
157.425000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
86
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 1
WX 1
162.550000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
87
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 2
WX 2
162.400000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
88
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 3
WX 3
162.475000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
89
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 4
WX 4
162.425000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
90
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 5
WX 5
162.450000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
91
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 6
WX 6
162.500000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
92
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 7
WX 7
162.525000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
93
VHF
SEARCH RESCUE EMT
SAREMT
155.160000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
127.3
FM
94
VHF
HAM 2 METER 146.42
HAM 42
146.420000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
100.0
FM
95
VHF
HAM 2 METER 146.52
HAM 52
146.520000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
100.0
FM
96
VHF
HAM 2 METER 146.55
HAM 55
146.550000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
100.0
FM
97
UHF
HAM 446.0
HAM
446.000000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
100.0
FM
98
UHF
HAM 446.03
HAM U3
446.030000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
100.0
FM
The original source of this article is RadioMaster Reports.

Disclaimer: Content provided in RadioMaster Reports is included for the sole purpose of educational information on a passive basis. This information may be useful to the public in the event of emergencies or disaster recovery, especially when normal techniques are not an available option. Users of this educational information are solely responsible for their actions.

©2013 RadioMaster Reports

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62 responses to “Program Your VHF UHF Transceivers for Disaster Preparedness with FRS GMRS PMR MURS BUSINESS WEATHER MARINE HAM Channel Frequencies

  1. transmit on some of these freqs in the usa with out proper licencing or a proper cerified radio is against FCC regulations and is illigal. Please consult FCC regulations if your in the usa before useing any freq for transmit. Im not sure about the laws of other counties. Please consult your local laws carefuly. The PMR freqs are a europian standard and conflict with the ham radio bands in the usa. If your gona freeband on UHF and VHF in the usa with out a licence on a cheep chinese radio ( and i dont condone this) use the MURS freqs and not the GMRS, FMRS, or other freqs. you wil be less likly to get in any trouble or interfere with other licenced traffic.

    Trinity KF5YFD

  2. Thanks, Trinity for comments! For VHF/UHF, we agree on your recommendation of MURS channels for normal every-day usage. GMRS is also a good choice. External gain antenna systems can be used to increase the limited distance range of either MURS or GMRS. Linear amplifiers and repeaters can greatly increase the range of handheld, mobile or base units.

    As for the details of licensing, governmental authorizations, rules, or legalities of specific radio frequencies and services: these were *purposely* not part of this article. License and legal issues are very well-covered in other forums. The focus of this site is primarily Emergency Disaster Preparedness Communications, Survivalist Communications, and SHTF Prepper communications. It is clearly not the objective of this site to discuss rules and regulations.

    In a severe SHTF situation, people will simply do whatever they need to do, and that includes using any means of communications they can access.

    This site covers international applications and radio communication information for those who travel to various areas of the world. Regarding PMR 446: In USA and many other places, the 446 MHz band is in the Ham band so, all the PMR channels can be used by all hams in those areas. In other places where the 446 MHz PMR is used, it is not a ham band. Since millions of these PMR446 radios exist, it behooves the prepper to prep for them.

    In an emergency or SHTF, any type of radio might be found, or need to be communicated with.

  3. Keep your fed business to yourself I am personally not interested in what you have to say about fed rules, you like live by them by all means do that, but keep quoting fed law like its parts of the constitution then you prob hit alot of deaf ears just an idea, most freebanders are quite awares of what they are doing and some also hold fcc lic, I dont, and know what Im doing I choose to keep it that way. I am personally not interesting in anything about the fed and this is my country. Ill transmit whenever and however I want respectfully. out.

    • Efraim Shultz

      Laws are what keep civil society civil. If you want to broadcast on a “ham” frequency then go get a ham license. All it takes is a little study. Stay off official Police and Civil Defense Frequencies. When the SHTF be part of the solution, not part of the problem. Look at the big picture. Remember the Golden Rule.

    • You’re clearly on the learning curve.

  4. Right On Steve W!! Read my mind! Thank you. John Kursey Upstate NY

  5. would love a baofeng file

  6. Richard Driskill

    Trinity (KF5YFD) is correct and has made helpful comments which should be taken into account. It doesn’t matter whether you agree with the rules and regulations, it only matters that you conduct your transmissions knowing that these rules and regulations, if broken, can bring a shi*storm down upon the user. Isn’t it the understanding that ‘prepping’ is an act to survive? What happens if you bring attention to yourself prior to the collapse, when the system is still working? You don’t think that it is possible to ascertain the location of a transmission in the blink of an eye? Or is it you don’t believe the FCC (or whatever governing body is in control in your nation) has the ability to enforce said rules? What if you are wrong? Doesn’t that put all your effort, investment, and plans at risk? Instead of being overtly defiant, how about being covertly intelligent.

    If you are a sniper, you don’t stand up and start yelling and waving your arms around shortly before the target is scoped. If you are a guy with a LGDB of gold, and a hand-cannon of a gun, on his way to secret it in a unknown location, you still don’t carry it on your shoulder as you make your way out the door. If you thought the success of your objective would still come to fruition, that would be delusional.

    Rich KK4VRE / WQST332 / KNJ2MB / etc.

  7. I programmed this via Chirp and the settings appear correctly matching on the radio. I can receive FRS channel transmisssions, but when I transmit the radio produces a Tone noise, but no audio is received on my other radio. any ideas?

  8. Figured out my issue. I can only TX up to 450Mhz on my Wouxun radio. My RX is upto 520Mhz.

    • The ICOM IC-T7H can be modified to transmit on all 2m and 70cm bands by removing one single diode chip. Mods can be found on the web easy enough. You need to get antennas [rubber ducks] for the various frequencies for all this to work.
      That means Police, Fire, Ambulance, SAR, Coastguard, Navy, Passenger Ships, Other Ships At Sea, Aircraft…I think you get the message.

  9. Thanks for this list and article it was really helpful!

  10. With respect to the TX vs RX issue, I found out that the Baofeng does not automatically assign tone to both the RX and TX, you have to do each individually..(meaning you can TX tone but may not RX tone that you need to hear..). I am FCC licensed as Amatuer and GMRS because I want to regularly use, practice with and develop my network. I do take precautions to try to limit my exposure, but this is my choice. In a true emergency, the FCC rules do allow for certain transmissions and a key point to remember is to play nice with others (at a minimum, just to avoid trouble..). I understand and repect both perspectives. Nice info – in a bad situation, just monitoring these frequencies should give a plethora of information and is totally legal (for now..:)

  11. Marine Channel 16 156.800 is an international distress frequency and should really be in a memory slot numbered 16

    • Turn on “Channel Name Display” on your radio to show it as MAR16.
      (Marine 16) instead of number.

  12. The ICOM IC-T7H can be modified to transmit on all 2m and 70cm bands by removing one single diode chip. Mods can be found on the web easy enough. You need to get antennas [rubber ducks] for the various frequencies for all this to work.
    That means Police, Fire, Ambulance, SAR, Coastguard, Navy, Passenger Ships, Other Ships At Sea, Aircraft…I think you get the message.

  13. Hi,

    Just wondering why GMRS Ch. 1 is duplicated in the 0 and 1 slots. Is this intentional? It looks like the same line entry.

    • It is intentional.
      You can change channel zero in the programming to your favorite channel.

  14. What is my best bet? UV-5R or BF-F8 or other????

    • Jason, if your wanting to stay with the UV-5R family of radio’s produced by Baofeng, then get either BF-F8+ or the BF-F8HP and that way all of your accessories will be interchangeable with the UV-5R to include the battery packs.

      The BF-F8HP is the only radio that will transmit at 8 watts, 4 watts or 1 watt. No other Baofeng radio will do that. The UV-5Rs employ the first generation chips and boards whereas the BF-F8+ and the BF-F8HP employ the second generation chips and boards therefore making receiving and transmitting much better.

  15. noneyabidness

    Dusty bump! Get the Baofeng UV-B5! Woot!!!

    • well considering that the baofeng uv-b5 radio cannot share battery packs with any other baofeng radio, you are shooting yourself in the foot. plus you are limiting yourself to 99 channels instead of 128. also the uv-b5 is not fully part 90 narrow band compliant since it does not have the 2.5khz channel step that is required on the new frequencies that are being issued.

      the best overall baofeng radio is the uv-82 series especially the uv-82c as that is the only baofeng radio that is fully compliant with part 90 and narrow banding mandates.

      the best baofeng from the uv-5r series is the bf-f8hp with the bf-f8+ coming in close behind.

  16. is there a hack/mod for the bf-f8hp to make it receive below 137 mhz in the am/aircraft frequencies? thank you

  17. Might want to relist the list when the following corrections are made.
    1, Ham and FRS are still wideband with no foreseeable change in the future.
    2. GMRS licensing is on its way out, therefore is good to be listed.
    3. Recognize that in a SHTF condition, the government will have either failed or fallen or tried to take the BOR (bill of rights) and the constitution away from the citizens, and will NOT be able to enforce FCC rules and regs.
    4. Include Federal freqs such as VTAC (VHF) which are used for HS (Homeland Security), and othe state and local governments for interoperability. Just a few recommendations..

    • DJ wrote:
      “Ham and FRS are still wideband with no foreseeable change in the future.”

      Answer:
      Sorry, DJ, but the Radiofreeq list is correct and you are wrong 🙂

      Here are some background details on FM / Wideband / Narrowband and frequency deviation (Δf) for communications:

      WFM = Wideband FM 15 kHz deviation [50 kHz channel spacing]
      FM = standard FM 5 kHz deviation [30 kHz or 25 kHz or 15 kHz channel spacing]
      NFM = Narrowband FM 2.5 kHz deviation [12.5 kHz channel spacing]

      STANDARDS:
      FRS radios are NFM
      FRS-GMRS radios without repeater capability are NFM
      FRS-GMRS radios with repeater capability are NFM or FM
      GMRS-only radios are FM but can be NFM
      GMRS repeaters are FM but can be NFM
      HAM radios are FM (some have NFM user selectable)
      MURS radios are NFM for all new MURS radios
      PMR radios are NFM
      Marine radios are FM
      Business/Public Safety radios as of 2013 are now NFM
      Business/Public Safety radios made 1970~2003 were FM
      Business/Public Safety radios prior to 1970 were WFM

      There are some exceptions to the above for specific new radios or some older systems, such as 30 MHz to 50 MHz. It varies a lot by country or area of the world, the above generalizations apply to USA.

      As of 2013 in USA, all public safety and business industrial land mobile radio systems operating in the 150-512 MHz radio bands must be Narrowband (such as 2.5 kHz FM deviation), operating with 12.5 kHz channel spacing.

      • As per the FCC website on narrow banding, more specifically, all existing Part 90 radio systems operating in the 150-174 MHz and 421-512 MHz bands have until January 1, 2013 to convert those systems either to a maximum bandwidth of 12.5 kHz or to a technology that provides at least one voice path per 12.5 kHz of bandwidth or equivalent efficiency.

        12.5 kHz is the narrow banding portion which is cutting the bandwidth in half from the 25 kHz where it has been. 6.25 kHz and 2.5 kHz are channel steps and especially the 2.5 kHz channel step was added during the transition to narrow banding.

        There are frequencies that are exempt from narrow banding and they are as follows: 152.0075 and 157.4500 MHz in the Public Safety Pool, and 152.4800, 157.7400, 158.4600, 462.7500, 462.7750, 462.8000, 462.8250, 462.8500, 462.8750, 462.9000, 462.9250, and 465.0000 MHz in the Business Industrial Pool.

        If you are living in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands you will have the following five additional paging only frequencies in the Business Industrial Pool: 150.8300, 150.9200, 151.0700, 151.1900 and 151.3100 that are exempt from narrow banding requirements.

        Ham radio frequencies are also exempt from the narrow banding requirement and they are not expected to switch to narrow banding any time soon. There are however some ham radio frequency coordinators that are having some narrow banding in their areas switched over to, but for the most part, ham radio equipment under part 97 do not have the capability of moving to narrow band. We would have to purchase Part 90 radio gear which we can use legally for ham radio operations if we were mandated by the FCC to cut our bandwidth in half down to the 12.5 kHz.

        FRS, GMRS and MURS radios and frequencies fall under FCC Part 95 requirements and therefore exempt from the narrow banding under rule Part 90. FRS radios are already operating in the narrow band range with their 2.5 kHz channel step and their 12.5 kHz band width. GMRS radios and their assigned frequencies are either 5 kHz channel step or 2.5 kHz channel step. But Part 95 radio service is exempt from the Part 90 narrow banding requirements of 2013.

        Marine band frequencies in the United States fall under FCC Part 80 rules.

  18. I bought a Baofeng UV-5R V2+ for shtf or just emergencies. I dont have my license yet, so right now im using it as just a scanner for weather, emergencies, etc…. So (even if it is illegal) is this radio able of picking up the MURS, FRS, GMRS, PMR, etc… frequencies?

    • Kevin Badger

      This radio will program any frequency from 136-174, 400-520. MURS, FRS, GMRS, PMR, et al are in those ranges.

      • Cool. It programs in those ranges. My question is, does it ‘Transmit’ on those frequency ranges as well or are they blocked to Ham Bands Only?

  19. Does anyone have recommendations for communicating with a Baofeng to another Baofeng without having a license? Any frequencies available for good distance? 4-5 miles?

    • Joe, since none of the Baofeng’s or Wouxun’s for that matter are Part 95 certified, legally you will not be able to use these radios on MURS. However, that being said, many people are totally ignoring the FCC rules and using FRS, GMRS and MURS frequencies on these throwaway radios.

      Here are the five MURS VHF frequencies: 151.8200 MHz, 151.8800 MHz, 151.9400 MHz, 154.5700 MHz, 154.600 MHz.

  20. Many people without a ham license are using the MURS VHF channels.
    MURS does not require a license or callsign.
    MURS (Channel 1) 151.820 MHz
    MURS (Channel 2) 151.880 MHz
    MURS (Channel 3) 151.940 MHz
    *there are technical equipment requirements for MURS, but those are mostly ignored by the general public who use Baofeng and other HT radios to achieve longer distance than GMRS channels.

  21. Great list.

  22. Great list but you might want to add:
    Germany/Sweden Freenet
    6 channels from 149.025 to 149.1125 MHz
    12.5kHz step NFM

    KDR 444 (Sweden & Norway)
    8 channel from 444,600 à 444,975 MHz
    25kHz step NFM

    Canal E (France/Alps emergency channel)
    161,300 MHz + CTS code TCS 123 Hz

    • FREENET is a set of European license-free VHF radio channels. Freenet started in Germany and has spread to some other European countries. It is like VHF CB. The potential distance range is generally more than PMR 446 UHF CB.
      (CHANNEL) FREQUENCY MODE
      (FREENET 1) 149.025000 MHz NFM Simplex
      (FREENET 2) 149.037500 MHz NFM Simplex
      (FREENET 3) 149.050000 MHz NFM Simplex
      (FREENET 4) 149.087500 MHz NFM Simplex
      (FREENET 5) 149.100000 MHz NFM Simplex
      (FREENET 6) 149.112500 MHz NFM Simplex

      ========================================

      ALPS CHANNEL E
      Channel E is the Emergency Search and Rescue (SAR) radio channel, it is only used in the Alps mountain border region around Switzerland and France, where Mountain SAR and ski patrols monitor this channel.
      (CHANNEL) FREQUENCY MODE
      (ALPS CANAL E) 161.300000 MHz FM Simplex PL=123Hz

      ========================================

      KDR 444 is a license-free set of UHF radio channels mainly active in Sweden and Norway. KDR is similar to FRS, PMR 446, or UHF CB and the potential distance range is about the same. KDR 444 also known as SRBR 444.
      (CHANNEL) FREQUENCY MODE
      (KDR 1) 444.600000 MHz FM Simplex
      (KDR 2) 444.650000 MHz FM Simplex
      (KDR 3) 444.800000 MHz FM Simplex
      (KDR 4) 444.825000 MHz FM Simplex
      (KDR 5) 444.850000 MHz FM Simplex
      (KDR 6) 444.875000 MHz FM Simplex
      (KDR 7) 444.925000 MHz FM Simplex
      (KDR 8) 444.975000 MHz FM Simplex

      • Transmitting on these [European] frequencies in the United States would be highly illegal as those frequencies in the 149 MHZ range and the some in the 161 MHz range are owned by our United States Department of Defense which fall under the rules and control of the NTIA.

        Just some thing to keep in the back of your mind.

        • This site covers international applications and radio communication information for those who travel to various areas of the world. As for the details of licensing, governmental authorizations, rules, or legalities of specific radio frequencies and services: these are *purposely* not part of this article. License and legal issues are very well-covered in other forums. The focus of this site is primarily Emergency Disaster Preparedness Communications, Survivalist Communications, and SHTF Prepper communications. It is clearly not the objective of this site to discuss rules and regulations. In a severe SHTF situation, people will simply do whatever they need to do, and that includes using any means of communications they can access. In an emergency or SHTF, any type of radio might be found, or need to be communicated with.

          • Brandon N1WTH

            Look I am going to say this politely not everyone is out to destroy what this site is for.

            In the spirit of prepping I say be seriously smart look these frequencies up BEFORE you consider trying to transmit just to keep you out of big brothers eye.

            We are a community and need to look out for one another.

            Happy Prepping and remember be smart do your own research after finding information at any website if in the us look up the FCC registered agencies to watch out on/for to monitor but not transmit on you can find a wealth of information just be safe.

  23. HELP! Hi, I downloaded the above file to load into my Baofeng UV-5R, but kept getting a Column mismatch error. I finally figured that one out. Spent hours fixing that. Then the WX rows wouldn’t load properly, fixed that. Now everything is showing up with no errors. BUT now the Chirp will NOT let me Up Load to the Radio! I exported the file into a chirp file and brought it back in, no help. Saved it as the Cv? file, still want let me upload to radio. ANY help would be appreciated. Thanks, Steve

    • Can someone please tell me what i am doing wrong that this file does not work? I am able to read the channels that came with the radio. I am able to back that file up without problem, but i cannot open this CSV file in CHIRP. All that shows up are channels with nothing in them. When i first try to open the file, the program wants me to select the radio again, and i do that, and then it just loads empty channels with “error” showing in the channel name boxes. Where am i going wrong?

      • Steve, stick close to following: 1-EXPORT working image file from CHIRP to csv. 2-EDIT csv in spreadsheet as necessary. 3-SAVE edited csv. 4-IMPORT saved csv to same image file in CHIRP. Only after importing your csv into the image file, will you be able to upload to radio.

  24. Thorough set of articles. Could you clarify the use of 67 KHz as default tone for the MURS, PMR, FRS, and FMRS frequencies? Is that SOP? One could think that no tone is the default setting.

    • PL TONE
      All channels in the list are default Carrier Squelch Receive.

      All FRS, GMRS, PMR, MURS, BUSINESS, and HAM channels are programmed for “Transmit PL Tone” with “Receive Carrier Squelch”.

      For interoperability, the Transmit PL is set to default to the most common tone frequency for each channel and type of service.
      67Hz PL Tone is the most common “privacy tone” for FRS.

      The Marine channels have the transmit PL tone turned off.

      The user may change and reprogram the PL Tone frequency as needed, or may desire to use Tone Squelch instead of Carrier Squelch.

  25. Hi. I finally by some miracle got them programed. However all the Tones are 88.5. Do I need to change them to 67? I was using your download so have no clue where the 88.5 came from. Also all the DTCS Codes are 023 and the DTCS Pol is NN. Are those correct? Appreciate your help.

  26. Radio Prepper

    There are many different reasons why so many of you have issues with Chirp programming.

    First and foremost, if you buy the cheapest programming cable you can find, you can reasonably expect that it’s a fake (i.e., illegal) cable made with a bogus Prolific chipset. Prolific got tired of Chinese companies ignoring their U.S. patent, so they wrote a new software driver years ago that looks to see if your Windows computer is attached to a “real” cable. If it is, your software driver worries are over (that’s not the same thing as the Chirp frequency programming software by the way). If not, expect to spend hours trying to get your fake cable to work. Some will succeed, many will not.

    Second, even if you have the correct cable driver installed, Chirp is not the most user friendly piece of software out there to use (by far). The more complex you want to program your radio, the more difficult Chirp becomes to understand.

    Third, many times folks (with older working versions of Chirp) will practically brick their newer radios by not knowing that older working versions of Chirp don’t always program newer versions of radios, especially newer firmware versions of Baofeng radios. Baofeng made it tougher to know your radio’s “real” firmware version since you can no longer simply hold down the [3] key on power up to see the radios firmware. All of them now report BFS297 regardless of their actual firmware, so you can easily brick a Baofeng UV-5R series, UV-82 series, or BF-F8 series radio by using an older version of Chirp.

    “If” you are really serious about communications during a SHTF event, don’t spend thousands of dollars on your stockpile and then treat your comm gear as an afterthought. Spend a few bucks on Amazon and get professional grade programming software for your radio gear.

    If the SHTF event does happen, the money you spent on quality gear (be it radios, software, guns, knives, flashlights, solar panels, etc., etc.) will long be forgotten and your stuff will just work.

  27. hassin bin sober

    Excellent site I found it looking for info on why my BF-F8 wont take a freq in the 440 range. Lots of good info and discussion here without resorting to childish BS.

  28. Where is the expanded list of channels. I,E. greater than 99.

  29. prepguy1999

    Yea that is perfect for our county prepper group we hang on channel murs 3 now. Way better than the frs 3

  30. Reblogged this on N6RKY’s Weblog.

  31. Along the same line…I’ve printed the Programming File Channel List twice this summer (June, and today). The TONE HZ column figures were 67.0 in June & now are 88.5 where the 67.0 were previously. Which is it and where is MOST RECENT and CURRENT listing for this list? Would a Version/date notation be a consideration? Thx for all the helpful information.
    TL

  32. Edward van natta

    Thanks for details about all the frequencies.

    • Better Safe Radio (@BetterSafeRadio)

      For larger, 200 channel radios, I’ve put together a complete SHTF frequency list.

  33. Can a UK ham yous 2m 70cm in the Philippines

  34. I know there are some who want to use the PMR frequencies in the US. I would advise don’t do it. Hams do guard their bands and if they hear you, they will turn you in. The FCC has given ham OOs (official observers) more “power” than before, which means the FCC will more likely follow up on complaints and give more weight to an OO report. Plus the FCC is policing the ham bands more than they used to. Get a ham license, it’s so easy to do. I know some will think that in a SHTF event, the rules go out the window. Not entirely true. Sometimes the government will clamp down even more. A few years ago, I bought an Icom receiver that could go to 2 GHz. Now you only get them if you are connected with a lab or college doing research. Remember, during WW2, ham radio was shut down so the government can use those frequencies. Nothing says they can’t do that to all of these frequencies.

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