Survival Channels for Baofeng Programming SHTF-HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS


Program Your VHF UHF Transceivers for Disaster Preparedness with FRS GMRS PMR MURS BUSINESS WEATHER MARINE HAM Channel Frequencies
Turn your Baofeng walkie talkie into a super SHTF survival radio with HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS channels. The secret is in this free programming file. When disaster hits, you won’t need to worry about which is best for emergency communications, because you can talk to anyone! Emergency preparedness is essential for radio communications.

BAOFENG SURVIVAL CHANNELS 99 RADIO FREQUENCIES

In an emergency, you may need to communicate with others on their channels…

©2013 RadioMaster Reports

In an emergency, you may need to communicate with others who are using various types of radios, on many different channels. Are they using an FRS radio? Or is it MURS or GMRS? Or are they on HAM 2 meters? Marine VHF? Don’t let a lack of preparation prevent your emergency communication needs. Whatever it is, wherever you are, prepare for it now by programming all those channels in your Baofeng radio. When disaster hits, just dial them up and talk, in any emergency situation. Are you prepared?

This frequency file is for programming VHF-UHF transceivers (VHF-UHF HT). It turns your Baofeng FM HT into a wonderful SHTF-HAM-FRS-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS-SAR radio for Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Communications.

CSV file for Chirp DOWNLOAD

Baofeng VHF UHF CSV FILE WITH HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS CHANNELS

This CSV file and its companion printable list contains a variety of useful frequencies for the Emcomm Operator, Prepper, Survivalist, or Disaster Preparedness Communicator.

PRINTABLE FREQUENCY CHART:

PROGRAMMING FILE FREQUENCY LIST WITH HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-SAR-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS CHANNELS  - CLICK FOR PRINT

All FRS, GMRS, PMR, and MURS channels for survivalists and preppers are programmed (transmitting the most common PL tone squelch but receiving carrier squelch for maximum interoperability). Highly recommended SHTF Survival channels, well-known Ham Prepper organizations’ calling channels, most common Marine VHF Simplex, along with Ham radio 2 meter simplex channels are included. NOAA Weather channels are provided for receive-only purposes. For easier use, each channel has a corresponding abbreviated Channel Name that can be displayed instead of the frequency, selectable in some types of radios.

The original source of this article is the RadioMaster Reports blog.

Many small inexpensive HTs, such as Baofeng, are sold without suitable default programming. To use these radios, as well as similar Ham radios, it is necessary to either program them manually using the keypad, or to use software to load the desired channel frequencies into the radios.
Chirp Radio Programming Software

CHIRP PROGRAMMING SOFTWARE

The Chirp software is convenient and popular.
The downloadable CSV file we provide here can be opened in Chirp, and it may be modified if necessary to add some of your own frequency channels. Then use a USB-to-Radio cable to load the file into your Baofeng or other brand of radio.

BAOFENG SQUELCH SOFTWARE MOD

Chirp software provides a fix for the well-known Baofeng squelch problem. This is a software modification that resets the squelch to enable higher tighter levels of squelch, controlled by the Baofeng radio’s squelch setting. The Baofeng Service Settings of the Chirp software are explained on the Chirp site:

Fixing the Baofeng Squelch Levels UV5R / UV82 / F8HP series

Available in CHIRP software version: 20150111 or newer

“The factory squelch settings on these models has long been known to have little or no impact on the actual squelch level. The smallest noise burst would easily pop open the squelch. Until now, it was one of those little ‘quirks’ you just needed to tolerate. “
“But no longer… Through the efforts of Jim KC9HI and the CHIRP development team, this has become a thing of the past. A new ‘Service Settings’ tab has been added to CHIRP which allows you to alter the factory level settings, so a weak signal can open level 1, and only a monster signal can open level 9.”

CSV file for Chirp DOWNLOAD

BaoFENG VHF UHF CSV FILE WITH SHTF-HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS CHANNELS

Open CSV File in Chirp

If you are not using a Baofeng, depending on the brand of radio you have, you may need to unlock your radio for full spectrum transmit. YMMV.

TYPES OF SERVICES IN THIS PROGRAMMING FILE 

Note: Material presented here on RadioMaster Reports purposely does not include information or advice about licensing, governmental authorizations, radio rules, or legalities concerning radio frequencies. Please see other radio forums for greater focus on such issues. The focus of this is technology details of frequencies, programming, and electronic radiocommunication for Emergency Disaster Preparedness and SHTF Channel Radio Survivalist Prepping.

LIMITATIONS

The design objective of this programming file is to maximize interoperability with common radio services within 99 channels, so that it can be used within the memory limitations of inexpensive radios. This has led to a small compromise, by not including some less-common business channels and marine commercial duplex radiotelephone channels. An additional larger channel list programming file will be posted on the RadioMaster Reports site for download, when it is updated.

FRS

Family Radio Service (FRS) is a low power, short range, radio system. FRS  walkie talkies are known as “bubble pack radios” because they are sold cheaply in the hang tab shelves of stores or in the toy section. They can be found nearly everywhere on the planet now, and are some of the most ubiquitous radio communication devices in the world. FRS radios are limited to a half-watt of output power (500 milliWatts) and have permanently attached antennas, preventing the addition of an external gain antenna. So, the normal range of FRS walkie talkies in a suburban environment is about a mile or less. FRS Frequencies are FM simplex, 7 channels at 462 MHz and 7 channels at 467 MHz in the UHF band. These channels are in between the GMRS frequencies. GMRS radios may also include FRS channels. The default PL tone for FRS is 67.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #1, or PL XZ, or Sub-channel CTCSS 01.

GMRS

General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) is a local distance radio system in the same UHF band as FRS. GMRS radios can be capable of longer distance range and greater dependability than FRS. GMRS is becoming more popular  as bubble pack walkie talkies (HT) include both GMRS and FRS channels. GMRS-specific frequencies are FM simplex or duplex with 8 channels at 462 MHz and 8 channels at 467 MHz in the UHF band. The maximum power level of a GMRS is limited to 50 Watts. The most common GMRS mobile, base, or repeater radios use external gain antennas. GMRS walkie talkie handheld transceivers (HT) have only 5 Watts or less, commonly with a ducky antenna. Full duplex repeaters can be used with GMRS. GMRS Repeaters have their input channel at 467 MHz, and their output at 462 MHz. The offset is exactly 5 MHz. For repeater use, the field units transmit on 467 Mhz and receive on 462 MHz. Most bubble pack GMRS radios are simplex-only, so they do not function through a repeater. They operate only on the repeater output frequency (GMRS Channels 15 through 22). The default PL tone for GMRS simplex is 67.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #1, or PL XZ, or Sub-channel CTCSS 01. In a GMRS radio, the GMRS channel number is often the same for simplex and duplex, but a secondary (programmable) feature of the channel controls whether it transmits duplex +5MHz split or simplex. The GMRS simplex and duplex (repeater) channels are included in this list and programming file. In the Channel Name, they are programmed and identified separately; the repeater channel has an R in the channel name. For example as GMR 20 is the simplex channel, and GMR20R is the repeater duplex channel. PL tones vary among different repeaters in various geographic areas. The default PL tone for GMRS repeater channels is 141.3 Hz, but it can be changed in the user’s radio programming to another PL tone frequency as required to hit specific repeaters.

PMR446

Personal Mobile Radio (PMR or PMR446) is a low power, short range, radio system similar to FRS. It is very common in Europe, Africa, and Asia.  Walkie talkie bubble pack PMR radios are sold cheaply. PMR radios are limited to a half-watt of output power (500 milliWatts). So, the normal range of PMR walkie talkies in a suburban environment is about a mile or less. PMR frequencies are commonly FM simplex, 8 channels at 446 MHz in the UHF band. An additional 14 digital channels are available for PMR446, but are less common. In USA and many other places, the 446 MHz band is assigned to Amateur Radio Service (Ham) so, all the PMR channels can be used by hams in those areas. The default PL tone for PMR is 67.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #1, or PL XZ, or Sub-channel CTCSS 01. The PMR Prepper channel (PMR 3) (446.03125 MHz) is somewhat interoperable with the Ham UHF Prepper channel (HAM U3) (446.030 MHz).

HAM

Amateur Radio Service, widely known as Ham Radio, is an internationally allocated radio service for non-commercial radio communications. It has frequency bands in all areas of the spectrum. The ham radio frequencies in this list are only a few of the most common VHF and UHF channels used by ham operators for local FM simplex. Additionally the list includes the Prepper Ham VHF simplex channel (146.420 MHz), the Survivalist Ham VHF simplex channel (144.550 MHz) and the Prepper Ham UHF simplex channel (446.030 MHz) that is somewhat interoperable with the PMR Prepper channel 3 (446.03125 MHz). The default PL tone for Ham is 100.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #12, or PL 1Z, or Sub-channel CTCSS 12. Most hams also make use of repeaters in the VHF and UHF bands, but the channels for these repeaters vary according to geographic area. There is no universal repeater channel frequency or PL tone that is valid in all areas, they are all different. When programming your radio, it is advisable to include the repeater channels and PL tones in your area. See a repeater directory for more information.

MARINE

Marine radio service in this list includes the most common simplex VHF channels in use by boats and ships, for inter-ship and safety communications by FM voice. Marine VHF radio is used on the high seas, inland waterways, lakes, and rivers by vessels and shore stations. No PL tone is used by Marine VHF radios, it is all carrier squelch. The Marine channels have the transmit PL tone turned off, and use Receive Carrier Squelch. Most Marine VHF radios also have duplex channels for use when communicating with shore radiotelephone and port operations. The duplex channels are purposely not included in this list, in order to keep the total number of channels below 99.

BUSINESS

Business radio, or commercial VHF and UHF radio channels, are generally set up for specific companies in a local geographic area. There are also a few business radio channels, called Business Itinerant, that are devoted to operation anywhere. These are low power simplex channels, and only 2 of them are included in this list. The Red Dot (151.625 MHz) and the Purple Dot (151.955 MHz) channels are common Business Itinerant channels, and they are some of the most popularly used channels on VHF for commercial or rental HT walkie talkies. The default PL tone for the Business channels is 67.0 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #1, or PL XZ, or Sub-channel CTCSS 01.

SAR

For EMERGENCY ONLY, SAR is a service channel for Search and Rescue (SAR) or Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) . The primary interoperability channel in USA for SAR is 155.160 MHz FM simplex. This is a very important channel to keep clear for emergency purposes, and should never be transmitted on for non-emergency communications! The purpose is to provide mobile, HT, and base communications for field operations of land or ground search and rescue teams, ambulances, and medical personnel at the scene of incidents. It is identified in the list as the channel name SAREMT. The default interoperability PL tone for SAR EMT is 127.3 Hz. It is also known as Privacy tone #19, or PL 3A, or Sub-channel CTCSS 19.

Programming Your Radio

The type of radio you have determines how you program it. You may have a mobile, base, or handheld (HT) radio. Some radios require manual programming. Most modern radios have the capability of programming via a cable adapter between your computer USB or serial port, and the microphone or data jack of the radio. Please see your instruction manual or user guide for your radio, for information about how to program it.

PL TONE

All channels in the list are default Carrier Squelch Receive.

All FRS, GMRS, PMR, MURS, BUSINESS, and HAM channels are programmed for Transmitting PL tone. For interoperability, the Transmit PL is set to default to the most common tone frequency for each channel and type of service.

The Marine channels have the transmit PL tone turned off. The user may change and reprogram the PL Tone frequency as needed, or may desire to use Tone Squelch instead of Carrier Squelch.

GMRS FRS MURS PMR MARINE BUSINESS HAM WEATHER

CSV PROGRAMMING FILE CHART

MEM CH SLOT
UHF VHF
CHANNEL DESCRIPTION
CHANNEL DISPLAY NAME
FREQUENCY RECEIVE
FREQUENCY TRANSMIT
OFF SET MHZ
PL
TONE HZ
MODE
0
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 1
FRS 01
462.562500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
1
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 1
FRS 1
462.562500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
2
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 2
FRS 2
462.587500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
3
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 3
FRS 3
462.612500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
4
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 4
FRS 4
462.637500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
5
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 5
FRS 5
462.662500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
6
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 6
FRS 6
462.687500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
7
UHF
FRS & GMRS CH 7
FRS 7
462.712500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
8
UHF
FRS CH 8
FRS 8
467.562500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
9
UHF
FRS CH 9
FRS 9
467.587500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
10
UHF
FRS CH 10
FRS 10
467.612500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
11
UHF
FRS CH 11
FRS 11
467.637500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
12
UHF
FRS CH 12
FRS 12
467.662500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
13
UHF
FRS CH 13
FRS 13
467.687500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
14
UHF
FRS CH 14
FRS 14
467.712500
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
15
UHF
GMRS CH 15
GMRS15
462.550000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
16
UHF
GMRS CH 16
GMRS16
462.575000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
17
UHF
GMRS CH 17
GMRS17
462.600000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
18
UHF
GMRS CH 18
GMRS18
462.625000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
19
UHF
GMRS CH 19
GMRS19
462.650000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
20
UHF
GMRS CH 20
GMRS20
462.675000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
21
UHF
GMRS CH 21
GMRS21
462.700000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
22
UHF
GMRS CH 22
GMRS22
462.725000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
23
UHF
GMRS CH 15 REPEATER 550
GMR15R
462.550000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
24
UHF
GMRS CH 16 REPEATER 575
GMR16R
462.575000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
25
UHF
GMRS CH 17 REPEATER 600
GMR17R
462.600000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
26
UHF
GMRS CH 18 REPEATER 625
GMR18R
462.625000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
27
UHF
GMRS CH 19 REPEATER 650
GMR19R
462.650000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
28
UHF
GMRS CH 20 REPEATER 675
GMR20R
462.675000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
29
UHF
GMRS CH 21 REPEATER 700
GMR21R
462.700000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
30
UHF
GMRS CH 22 REPEATER 725
GMR22R
462.725000
DUPLEX+
5.0
TX PL
141.3
FM
31
UHF
PMR446 CH 1
PMR 1
446.006250
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
32
UHF
PMR446 CH 2
PMR 2
446.018750
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
33
UHF
PMR446 CH 3
PMR 3
446.031250
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
34
UHF
PMR446 CH 4
PMR 4
446.043750
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
35
UHF
PMR446 CH 5
PMR 5
446.056250
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
36
UHF
PMR446 CH 6
PMR 6
446.068750
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
37
UHF
PMR446 CH 7
PMR 7
446.081250
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
38
UHF
PMR446 CH 8
PMR 8
446.093750
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
39
VHF
MURS CH 1
MURS 1
151.820000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
40
VHF
MURS CH 2
MURS 2
151.880000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
41
VHF
MURS CH 3
MURS 3
151.940000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
NFM
42
VHF
MURS CH 4 BLUE DOT
MURS 4
154.570000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
43
VHF
MURS CH 5 GREEN DOT
MURS 5
154.600000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
44
VHF
BUSINESS RED DOT
BUSRED
151.625000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
45
VHF
BUSINESS PURPLE DOT
BUSPUR
151.955000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
67.0
FM
46
VHF
MARINE CH 01A
MAR01A
156.050000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
47
VHF
MARINE CH 03A
MAR03A
156.150000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
48
VHF
MARINE CH 05A
MAR05A
156.250000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
49
VHF
MARINE CH 06
MAR06
156.300000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
50
VHF
MARINE CH 07A
MAR07A
156.350000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
51
VHF
MARINE CH 08
MAR08
156.400000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
52
VHF
MARINE CH 09
MAR09
156.450000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
53
VHF
MARINE CH 10
MAR10
156.500000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
54
VHF
MARINE CH 11
MAR11
156.550000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
55
VHF
MARINE CH 12
MAR12
156.600000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
56
VHF
MARINE CH 13
MAR13
156.650000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
57
VHF
MARINE CH 14
MAR14
156.700000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
58
VHF
MARINE CH 15
MAR15
156.750000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
59
VHF
MARINE CH 16 SAFETY
MAR16
156.800000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
60
VHF
MARINE CH 17
MAR17
156.850000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
61
VHF
MARINE CH 18A
MAR18A
156.900000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
62
VHF
MARINE CH 19A
MAR19A
156.950000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
63
VHF
MARINE CH 20A
MAR20A
157.000000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
64
VHF
MARINE CH 21A
MAR21A
157.050000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
65
VHF
MARINE CH 22A
MAR22A
157.100000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
66
VHF
MARINE CH 23A
MAR23A
157.150000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
67
VHF
MARINE CH 62
MAR62
156.125000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
68
VHF
MARINE CH 63A
MAR63A
156.175000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
69
VHF
MARINE CH 65A
MAR65A
156.275000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
70
VHF
MARINE CH 66A
MAR66A
156.325000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
71
VHF
MARINE CH 67
MAR67
156.375000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
72
VHF
MARINE CH 68
MAR68
156.425000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
73
VHF
MARINE CH 69
MAR69
156.475000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
74
VHF
MARINE CH 71
MAR71
156.575000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
75
VHF
MARINE CH 72
MAR72
156.625000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
76
VHF
MARINE CH 73
MAR73
156.675000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
77
VHF
MARINE CH 74
MAR74
156.725000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
78
VHF
MARINE CH 75
MAR75
156.775000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
79
VHF
MARINE CH 76
MAR76
156.825000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
80
VHF
MARINE CH 77
MAR77
156.875000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
81
VHF
MARINE CH 78A
MAR78A
156.925000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
82
VHF
MARINE CH 79A
MAR79A
156.975000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
83
VHF
MARINE CH 80A
MAR80A
157.025000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
84
VHF
MARINE CH 81A
MAR81A
157.075000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
85
VHF
MARINE CH 88A
MAR88A
157.425000
SIMPLEX
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
86
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 1
WX 1
162.550000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
87
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 2
WX 2
162.400000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
88
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 3
WX 3
162.475000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
89
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 4
WX 4
162.425000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
90
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 5
WX 5
162.450000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
91
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 6
WX 6
162.500000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
92
VHF
WEATHER NOAA CH WX 7
WX 7
162.525000
RX ONLY
0.0
NO PL
00.0
FM
93
VHF
SEARCH RESCUE EMT
SAREMT
155.160000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
127.3
FM
94
VHF
HAM 2 METER 146.42
HAM 42
146.420000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
100.0
FM
95
VHF
HAM 2 METER 146.52
HAM 52
146.520000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
100.0
FM
96
VHF
HAM 2 METER 146.55
HAM 55
146.550000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
100.0
FM
97
UHF
HAM 446.0
HAM
446.000000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
100.0
FM
98
UHF
HAM 446.03
HAM U3
446.030000
SIMPLEX
0.0
TX PL
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The original source of this article is RadioMaster Reports.

Disclaimer: Content provided in RadioMaster Reports is included for the sole purpose of educational information on a passive basis. This information may be useful to the public in the event of emergencies or disaster recovery, especially when normal techniques are not an available option. Users of this educational information are solely responsible for their actions.

©2015 RadioMaster Reports

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19 responses to “Survival Channels for Baofeng Programming SHTF-HAM-FRS-PMR-GMRS-MURS-MARINE-WEATHER-BUSINESS

  1. Milton Richards

    An absolutely superb list for monitoring communications. Unlicensed transmitting, however, is a different story. The tricky part is defining what constitutes an emergency.

    • Daniel Hunter

      In an SHTF or other “Survival” situation, the “LAW” doesn’t exist . . . No FCC . . . No COPS . . . Just LIFE or DEATH . . . PERIOD !!!

      So, “unlicensed transmitting” means “NOTHING” in that situation !!!

      • Unless we are experiencing an apocalyptic end of the world event that affects the entire planet, or at least North America, the “LAW” absolutely does exist, and will continue to exist. If you think otherwise, then please review Louisiana during the Hurricane Katrina disaster, or Homestead, Florida during their last hurricane, or any of the earthquake disasters that struck the West Coast.

        A “SHTF” situation does not have to be widespread to be a serious threat to survival. Local events can be just as devastating, just on a local scale and a shorter time frame. And you can bet that the “LAW” will be converging on the area and monitoring everything that goes on.

        • At the risk of resurrecting a dead thread, part 97 seems to address this (sort of). I wonder why folks resist getting licensed. They can develop the skill set needed for emergency situations.

          • I’m not going to bother explain entirely why I refuse to get a license, yet there are many. Those who do not understand why folks like me are opposed to a license, do not fully understand what we are headed into any way, so I will not bother further. Rest assured that I will not likely need and will use the HAM bands during the crisis I am expecting. And if I did, #1, it would be only for emergency situations, and #2, if I desired to during a non life threatening situation, the ‘law’ would not catch me anyway. For as long as the repeaters stay operational, I will, however, be monitoring.

            • Ok bro. For the rest of us, getting a Ham license will allow you to help your community during natural disasters, etc. And that is no small thing – sort of one of the things that Prepping is about.

              • Maybe the rest of you could get together and make the first blog to extol upon the FCC, Part 97, and why every prepper needs an amateur radio license walt? Oh wait…

                @Milton, Jerry, and Chief – Have a link showing where an operator was given a notice or fine by the FCC for unlicensed operation in the amateur bands and that WASN’T being a complete asshole on the air over the course of months?

                • Um, I never even mentioned fines. My point was simply that getting a license (easy to do, low cost) allows you broader access to disaster response and other preparedness activities. It also allows you to take an active part in low-level emergency responses (like damage assessment after a tornado for instance).
                  Now if that’s not something that interests you then no worries – but I do find it odd that those of us that may choose to do so are apparently the “wrong” kind of prepper. SMH.

  2. Inconsequential

    Check your site a couple times a week hoping for updates. Thanks for all the great info already posted.

  3. Thanks for the list.

  4. thanks for this great article and the files. my whole team has it loaded in their radios and it works very well

  5. jorn jacabsen

    Yes the boafengs are a good radio and screaming bargain. However the antenna that comes with the radio is not suitable for all the frequencies recommended, and will have a high SWR that may ruin the radio over time if it is not operated in the 2m or 70cm bands. To operate the radio outside those bands, other antennas must be attached. I am one of the very few to warn others about this. ..

  6. Information is great. but i couldn’t get the .csv file imported to my Boafeng BF-F9v2+ . where did i go wrong?

    • Open the CSV and copy/paste the info into the fields in Chirp. Once you have done that, save it as a new file and then use the new file to make changes or transfer to a new radio.

  7. I was just researching that very same thought in regards to the Boafeng antenna (GMRS & MURS) and came across your post. Spent most of the day researching how to create a base antenna to operate within the GMRS & MURS frequencies (Cross Band mobile) and realized that if the Cross Band radio has a special antenna then so should the HT’s

    Is there a solution for the Boafengs?

  8. Why do the FRS/GMRS/PMR/MURS all have a privacy tone entered? Should it be turned off so we can hear anyone transmitting on these frequencies?

    • “All FRS, GMRS, PMR, and MURS channels for survivalists and preppers are programmed (transmitting the most common PL tone squelch but receiving carrier squelch for maximum interoperability).”

  9. I wanted to load this into my UV5R but it keeps saying “unknown file format” when I try to import it into Chirp. I’m pretty new to these radios, can someone steer me in the right direction? I had saved the file in my Dropbox and tried to import it into Chirp from there. I’d love to get these frequencies into my radio. Any thoughts?

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